Dawn Mitchell

Dawn Mitchell 1

Dawn remembers growing up in Stratton Road in the 1960s and the diversity and character of the street in those years

Dawn Mitchell 2

Dawn remembers beginning school at Widden in 1965 and the school as a social melting pot

Dawn Mitchell 3

More memories of Widden School, its buildings and teachers in the 1960s

Dawn Mitchell 4

Dawn remembers school meals as an introduction to a different culture compared to the West Indian meals she ate at home

Dawn Mitchell 5

Memories of the learning that took place between different generations and cultures

Dawn Mitchell 6

The shops of Barton Street in the 1960s and half-day closing

Dawn Mitchell 7

Dawn remembers the coal fires and paraffin lamps in the houses in Stratton Road

Dawn Mitchell 8

Dawn remembers the multicultural, friendly character of Barton in the 1960s and suggests how the self-contained nature of the area promoted this

Dawn Mitchell 9

What life was like working in the shirt factory in Alfred Street

Dawn Mitchell 10

How learning between different generations and cultures happens through children

A West Indian family in Stratton Road in the 1960s

By Ollie Taylor

In this interview, Dawn recalls what it was like growing up in a West Indian family in Stratton Road.

In the early clips, she remembers her first experiences of school at Widden in 1965 and the teachers and the school buildings, as well as the school meals and how they introduced her to a different culture through food.

She goes on to recall the shops on Barton Street in the 1960s, their hours, and her working life in the shirt factory in Alfred Street.

Dawn's memories are filled with reflections on the unique, friendly, and multicultural character of Barton in the 1960s, and how the different cultures and generations have learned from each other.

This page was added by Ollie Taylor on 04/12/2011.